Saturday, 31 July 2010

The Woodcutter by Reginald Hill - review


I recently finished reading the latest mystery to be written by one of the genre’s stars, Reginald Hill. The Woodcutter is a stand-alone thriller, set mostly in Cumbria, where Hill now lives, and it tells the story of the rise, fall and renaissance of a remarkable character called Wolf Hadda.

Hadda, the son of a woodcutter, who falls for a glamorous young woman called Imogen. She is the daughter of the local squire, but despite the gap in class and wealth, they are strongly attracted to each other. She challenges him to win her devotion, and he leaves in mysterious circumstances, returning only when his fortune has been made. But what happened during his absence? A short section at the start of the book provides some, but not all, of the explanation. Imogen doesn’t ask too many questions – she marries him, and for a while, all goes well. Hadda’s business empire prospers, he seems to be the man who has everything. But one day, his world falls apart when he is accused of disgraceful crimes.

Hadda loses everything – his fortune, his family, his friends. He is crippled and thought unlikely to survive. But against the odds, he battles on, assisted by a sympathetic psychiatrist, a likeable woman called Alva. Finally, he is released from prison and he returns to his old hunting ground in Cumbria, where he is further aided by Luke, the local vicar. By now his wife has married again – to his former lawyer, the rascally Toby Estover. How will Hadda react – and will he seek to extract vengeance from those who tried to destroy him?

This book seems to follow the pattern of The Count of Monte Cristo, but it isn’t a straightforward revenge thriller by any means. In due course, the narrative veers off in an unexpected direction. Hill keeps his readers on their toes, defying them to guess what will happen next. I certainly did not foresee a startling twist involving Imogen, but I did think that Hadda had some of the same appeal as Hill’s greatest creation, Andy Dalziel. This is a splendidly entertaining book, which I thoroughly recommend.

11 comments:

Margot Kinberg said...

Martin - Thanks for this review. It does sound like a terrific read. I've enjoyed the Dalziel/Pascoe novels I've read, and it sounds as though this one is up to those standards.

Anonymous said...

I just finished reading this book and agree entirely with the review. I think it's one of his best and it had a very entertaining conclusion

Anonymous said...

I am halfway through The Woodcutter and it's a really unputdownable read.
I have enjoyed many of Reginald Hill's books and look forward to many more. Thank you Reginald, you're the best.

Anonymous said...

kept me reading until three in the morning - well worth feeling awful for the next day!

One of hills very best. Wolf is a compelling character. Is a sequal possible?

Anonymous said...

I'm afraid I think he should have stuck to Dalziel and Pasco, always excellent. This is a poor alternative.

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davf said...

New to books by Reginald Hill but after reading this, searching for more. One of the best books i have ever read. Un put downable and unmissable.

davf said...

Marvellous book, a must read.

Anonymous said...

I've read exactly 100 pages of it and am now giving up. It's way too slow moving: endless self-indulgent backstory that should have remained in the author's notes.

PattisPages said...

Too slow (and too long) for me also, but thanks for the review.

Anonymous said...

Don't understand the negative comments from a few people, a fantastic read, very atmospheric and keeps you guessing, read it now!!